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On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.

On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.U.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophagesU.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophagesU.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophagesU.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophages

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On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.U.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophages

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On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.U.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophagesU.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophages

On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.On September 10, according to foreign news reports, three deaths were confirmed in Indiana, Minnesota and California last Friday. Following the number of cases reported in Illinois and Oregon, the number of reported cases reached 450. "Although this investigation is ongoing, people should consider not using e-cigarette products," said Dr. Dana Meaney-Delman, Incident Manager of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in response to lung injuries. "People who use e-cigarette products should monitor their symptoms, such as coughing, shortness of breath, chest pain, nausea and vomiting-and immediately seek medical help for any health problems. ”After several weeks after recommending users to stop using e-cigarettes, the CDC, FDA and HHS finally advised consumers to avoid using unlicensed products and avoid buying untested, unregulated, and therefore potentially unsafe electronic products on the street. liquid. Most cases occur in young or young adults, and the acute disease appears to be lipoid pneumonia, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and/or chemical pneumonia. Vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate) is close to the answer and the cause is still unknown, but New York health authorities have confirmed that most of the e-cigarette products seized in the state contain vitamin E oil (tocopherol acetate). In addition, the FDA has received about 120 samples for testing, and 10 of the 18 THC samples contained vitamin E oil. Contaminated products include products under the brand names Chronic Carts, Dank Vapes and West Coast Carts, but the disease is linked to multiple other illegal market brands in multiple states. Last week, an article on Leafly reported that a new thinner called Honey Cut entered the illegal e-cigarette market at the end of 2018. This product dilutes THC oil without diluting it, and it is known that pen manufacturers use vitamin E oil because it is an inexpensive thickener. When officials at Terpenes manufacturer True Terpenes tested Honey Cut earlier this year, they discovered that it contained Vitamin E oil. Lung lipid-loaded macrophages At the same time, a study published last week in the "New England Journal of Medicine" found a previously unrecognized feature of a respiratory disease associated with e-cigarettes. In the lungs of these patients, doctors found a large number of immune cells containing a large number of oily droplets, called lipid-rich macrophages. "The remarkable and consistent feature of our reported cases is the presence of lipid-containing macrophages observed with Oil Red O staining in BAL samples, which is not attributable to the inhalation of exogenous lipid material. In addition, the diffuse parenchymal opacity seen on the CT scan has no low attenuation (in Hounsfield units), consistent with classic lipoid pneumonia. Although the pathophysiological significance of these lipid-containing macrophages and their relationship with the etiology of the syndrome is still unclear, we think they may be useful markers of this disease, "read the research abstract." This discovery may help doctors diagnose the condition more quickly and provide clues to the cause. "Although it is not yet certain, these lipid-containing macrophages may help to confirm or rule out this disease," said the lead study author, a doctor of medicine, a doctor of medicine, and an intensive care lung specialist at U of U. "They may also help understand the causes of this disease," he added.U.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophagesU.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophagesU.S. e-cigarette users have lung diseases related to vitamin E oil and lipid-rich macrophages